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The baseline rate for a bricklayer is to lay 1, bricks a day; [ citation needed ] if the hod carrier is serving a team of two then he must move 2, bricks although it is not uncommon for experienced hod carriers to serve three bricklayers.

The World Record for moving bricks by hod is 12 minutes and was set by John Logan, age 46, on 12 February From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Hod carrier. Archived from the original on Well clearing all those bricks by hand, it seemed so very slow So I hoisted up a barrel and secured the rope below But in me haste to do the job, I was just too blind to see That a barrel full of building bricks, is heavier than me.

So when I had untied the rope, the barrel fell like lead And clinging tightly to the rope I started up instead I took off like a rocket and to my dismay I found That half way up I met the bloody barrel coming down.

Well the barrel broke me shoulder, as ONTO the ground it sped And when I reached the top I banged the pulley with me head I held on tight, though numb with shock from this almighty blow And then the barrel spilled out half its load, fourteen floors below Now when those building bricks fell from the barrel to the floor I then outweighed the barrel so I started down once more I held on tightly to the rope as I flew down to the ground And I landed on those building bricks that were scattered all around.

Now as I lay there on the deck, I thought I'd passed the worst But when the barrel reached the top, that's when the bottom burst A shower of bricks rained down on me, I knew I had no hope And In all of the confusion, I let go the bloody rope.

Over a long number of years there has been much speculation concerning this song. I wrote this song under it's original title Paddy and the Barrell in , and first performed it in The Dyers Arms in Coventry at this time, and in Sean Cannon, later to become a member of the Dubliners began to perform it in the folk clubs under the title The Sick Note. The song was based on Gerard Hoffnung's wonderful address to the Oxford Union, but the story in a more simple form dates back to the English music halls in the 's and appeared in the Readers Digest in I personally gave the words of this song to Noel Murphy in a night club in Coventry in the early seventies and his only contribution to this song was to change the title to Murphy and the Bricks, and when this song was recorded Noel Murphy was obliged to remove his name from the writers credits, I still have a letter from Misty River Music to this effect.

The song under more than 20 alternative titles has since been recorded more than times worldwide, and in every version the words are identical. This song under all alternative titles has always been the exclusive copywright of myself, Pat Cooksey, and is registered with The Performing Rights Society in London. No other artist had any input into this song nor is any claim for arrangement valid. Pat Cooksey, Nuremberg, Germany. If you've got half an hour to spare, here is the whole speech on YouTube.

I still think it's worth a listen. Hoffnung at Oxford Union. Don't we tend to imprint on the version we heard first? Recitation performance isn't something that suits everyone's skill set, so it's a lovely thing to have as a song for those of us who aren't Gerard Hoffnung. I've only heard a couple people perform this as a song, and each time I enjoy the delight of the people who've never heard it before. And each time I think "ah, but you should hear the Gerard Hoffnung version We were flatmates at the time, and he sang it to me when I came home from work, and in the folkclub that evening, as he said in the thread re-posted above.

Although I didn't keep detailed records at that tender age, this piece appeared as a "poem" each time attibuted to a different reader as an original work - as I recall from reading the RD - approximately - in , , , , , - and probably numerous times since. That's about the era when I decided that "you can't trust the RD" but it did turn me on to watching the "fillers" in the newspaper.

And I landed on the broken bricks that were all scattered 'round. Well, lay their groaning on the ground I thought I passed the worst, When the barrel hit the pulley wheel, and then the bottom burst.

Well a shower of bricks rained down on me - I hadn't got a hope. As I lay there moaning on the ground: I let go of the bloody rope. That said. I see there is already a member Pat Cooksey and it looks fairly new to me. I suspect you succeded in creating your membership but have problems with cookies. Further attempts to join under the name Pat Cooksey will provide duplicate errors. Unless things have changed, there has often been confusion between the terms used on the membership system.

One I remember was it could tell you your "code name" was taken - code name referred to your user name not your password. Pat Cooksey Thank you so very, very much for this song!!!!!!!!!!! It was the very first 'Dubliners' song I learned by heart And so I stand corrected because every time when I listened to it I ended up choking with laughter Hahahahahahahahahahahaha!

Merely thinking about it still brings a grinn to my face. Many 's the time that I wanted to play a trick on my boss and come up with a really good sick note, but un fortunately I never had never anything to do with hauling bricks : Your fan Ernie.

Watch your e-mail for instructions. I met a man tonight who tells me he heard the sick note on the radio in Sydney, in Australia last week. If there are any Mudcatters down under perhaps you could enlighten me.

Best wishes to all, Pat. From: Pat Cooksey Date: 18 May 02 - AM I just had a phone call from the folk music club in Nuremberg, The MaCalmans sang my song there last week and they were amazed to hear that the writer also lives in Nuremberg, small world. Mick always articulates his words- and he had the audience hanging on every word.

Great fun. I had no idea that Mr. Cooksey was still amongst us, so to speak. Welcome, Pat Cooksey! Date: 18 May 02 - PM As a result of this thread several artists have contacted me direct regarding royalties on their recordings of my song, thanks to them, and Mudcat.

I posted on your welcome thread, but would like to say, again, it is a pleasure to have you join us! Would love to hear the writer sing it any cd.

Well done. I have an uncle, Irish living in Oxford. And at a family party, he did a rendition. It was not sung but told as a story. In his very mildly Oxford-ised accent it was absolutely terrific. I wonder where he got "his" version. Must ask him the next time I see him. Date: 19 May 02 - AM The complete history of this song may be found on this thread,I think your uncle's version was from Gerrard Hoffnung. I seem to remember it as attached to one Irish version - but that almost goes without saying Sorry I can't be more specific but I can confirm the prevalence of that particular name.

Regards, Bob Bolton. Date: 19 May 02 - AM. As you can see we have had several other threads on this song, so it is really great to be able to add the definitive one to the list.

Thanks, again, for joining us! Date: 20 May 02 - PM. Date: 20 May 02 - PM Thanks to you all for your help, I'm afraid I still am unable to follow Joe's instructions, My computer is in German and although I speak the language, I don't understand the technical language, I will summon help tomorrow, in the meantime please feel free to contact me at e.

Best Wishes, Pat. Date: 21 May 02 - AM My version of this song features on my c. Date: 22 May 02 - AM. Pat is a founder member of the club and he put on a magnificent show last night in a very intimate acoustic setting. Guess what - He missed out a verse in the Sick Note. We will miss her at Nenagh Singers Circle although I'm sure she will be back from time to time.

It sure looks like your theme in another form. I love your song! Sandy Possibly the funniest story in a long while. This is a true story. This explains the two broken legs. From: pict Date: 28 Feb 03 - PM There was also a short TV film in Norway that duplicated the events of the song but I noticed that some Norwegian had claimed copyright on it what is the legal situation in such a case where a film has been made of a song.

In Denmark some guy has copyrighted the tune to ally bally bee a famous traditional song from Scotland and set Danish words to it. Most Danes believe that is a Danish tune. There's a lot of thievery going on. Oh well I though maybe I could make a few dollars.


A friend of mine has Ronnie Drews version recorded live at his farewell German show, superb. Thanks, Pat, for contributing to this forum. Ronnie Drew always gave a great rendition of it, in any case, and I can relate to the buzz of the last show of a tour. Its worldwide popularity, with over recordings to date, is indeed a wonder to me when I think back to it's humble beginnings in The Dyer's Arms, in Coventry. That's about the era when I decided that "you can't trust the RD" but it did turn me on to watching the "fillers" in the newspaper. Now, this is a very tragic thing Or browse results The Sick Note (The Bricklayers Song) :. The reason I started The Sick Note (The Bricklayers Song) original thread was that I recently regained the publishing rights of this song after years of mismanagement and fraud by the original publisher, and before I re-assign the song I need to have as much information as possible regarding it's use. Pat Cooksey, Nuremberg, Germany.
Сборни - Български народни песни (Vinyl, LP), From Now On - Supertramp - The Very Best Of Supertramp (CD), Sloop John B - The Beach Boys - Sunshine Dream (Cassette), Splash, The More I See
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9 thoughts on “The Sick Note (The Bricklayers Song)

  1. The above song under all alternative titles has always been and remains the sole copyright of the original writer, PAT COOKSEY. The song was composed and first performed by me in Coventry in and is registered with THE PERFORMING RIGHTS SOCIETY in London under it's orginal title THE SICK NOTE and all the above alternative titles.
  2. The Bricklayers Song by The Corries and Ray Stevens, The Sick Note by The Dubliners, etc,etc, and also Murphy and the Bricks. No other artist had any input into this song nor is any claim for arrangement valid. Pat Cooksey, Nuremberg, Germany.
  3. Dear sir I write this note to you to inform you of me plight, And at the time of writing, I am not a pretty sight. Me body is all black and blue, me face a deathly gray. And I write this note to tell you why Paddy's not at work today. While working on the fourteenth floor some bricks I had to clear.
  4. Lyrics to 'Paddy's Sick Note' by Dubliners: Dear sir I write this note to you to tell ya of me plight, And at the time of writing, I am not a pretty sight. Me body is all black and blue, me face a deathly gray. And I write this note to say, why Paddy's not at work today.
  5. G D G Dear Sir I write this note to you to tell you of my plight C G D For at the time of writing it I'm not a pretty sight C G D C My body is all black and blue, my face a deathly grey G C.
  6. This song under all alternative titles has always been the exclusive copywright of myself, Pat Cooksey, and is registered with The Performing Rights Society in London. This includes Dear Boss by The Clancy brothers, The Bricklayers Song by The Corries and Ray Stevens, The Sick Note by The Dubliners, etc,etc, and also Murphy and the Bricks.
  7. A brick hod is a three-sided box for carrying bricks or other building materials, often cafpianewsfirase.ardhawroezaptualcfacasmossransvanlinu.co bears a long handle and is carried over the shoulder. A hod is usually long enough to accept 4 bricks on their side. However, by arranging the bricks in a chevron fashion, the number of bricks that may be carried is only limited to the weight the labourer can bear and the unwieldiness of that load.
  8. The Sick Note In Pat wrote his comedy classic The Sick Note which Sean also began to perform, and the song quickly became a big hit in English and Scottish folk clubs. This song, under a variety of different titles detailed on The Sick Note lyrics page, has since become one of the most widely recorded and popular contemporary folk songs worldwide in the last thirty years.
  9. Lyrics to 'The Bricklayer's Song' by The Corries. Dear Sir I Write This Note To You To Tell You Of My Plight For At The Time Of Writing It I'm Not A Pretty Sight My Body Is All Black And Blue, My Face A Deathly Grey And I Write This Note To Say Why I Am Not At Work Today.

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